Salmon

Date: 

12 Feb 2015

Author: 

Rodger Hunter

Publisher: 

Cowichan Watershed Board

Date: 

12 Mar 2015

Author: 

Rodger Hunter

Publisher: 

Cowichan Watershed Board

Water Temperatures

Parker Jefferson, One Cowichan, January 21, 2015

Spawning cohoI have had my feet in the river almost every day for the past few weeks, enjoying our great winter weather and river conditions while pursuing the elusive winter steelhead.  The river is very busy again this year with anglers travelling from all over the Island as well as the Lower Mainland and beyond to try to catch and release one of these magnificent creatures.  BC Outdoors magazine just named the Cowichan one of the top ten steelhead rivers in the province.

Stakeholders say local control key to saving Cowichan chinook run

By Peter Rusland, Cowichan News Leader Pictorial, April 19, 2013

Rescue plans for Cowichan River’s threatened chinook salmon, and their habitat, lie in gaining local control from Victoria of the waterway’s ecosystem, local stewards explain.

Reasons for requesting that control, and tactics to save the heritage Cowichan’s habitat, are expected to surface at today’s salmon session — stocked with government experts, plus valley stewards and leaders — at Duncan’s Travelodge Silver Bridge Inn.

“It’s ‘If you can’t get there from here, how do we make a map to get there?’” local Paul Rickard of the B.C. Wildlife Federation said of today’s invitation-only habitat huddle.

Fish in the Cowichan Watershed

FishSpeciesInCowichanWatershedThe Cowichan Watershed is home to many fish species. This is a function of both the size of the watershed and its incredible ecological richness as habitat and in terms of nutrients.

The ecological health of the watershed is reflected in the health of its fish. It's a mutual relationship. Healthy fish make a healthy watershed, and vice versa.

Click here for a table listing the fish in the Cowichan Watershed. The table shows fish presence recorded in a number of streams and three lakes in the watershed, and indicates whether they are exotic/introduced species, and shows their BC Conservation and COSEWIC status.

On this page we look at a few representative fish of the Cowichan Watershed, including some "Salmonids", which are the most abundant and ecologially and economically the most important fish, at "Exotic/Introduced" species, and a couple of "Rare or Endangered" fish.

"Anadromous" is the term used to describe fish which spend some part of their lives in fresh water and some in salt water. Salmon are anadromous.

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